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Table of Contents
SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 102-104

Strengthening the component of obtaining feedback from patients and using the same to facilitate the teaching of medical students


1 Deputy Director—Academics, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth—Deemed to be University, Medical Education Unit Coordinator and Member of the Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth—Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission17-May-2022
Date of Acceptance06-Jul-2022
Date of Web Publication13-Dec-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV)—Deemed to be University, Thiruporur–Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District 603108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/AMJM.AMJM_21_22

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  Abstract 

The process of assessment and delivering feedback to the medical students has been acknowledged as the key aspects to ensure comprehensive professional development. This calls for the need to utilize every learning opportunity and provide students with some form of constructive feedback for aiding them to attain the learning competencies. The exposure or interaction with patients plays an important role in helping the medical students establish linkage between theoretical knowledge and clinical practice and understands the practical relevance of the learned topics. Feedback received from patients can prove to be a significant add-on and help students to ascertain what has been done well and which area needs improvement. To conclude, patients are an important stakeholder and, apart from contributing to the advancement of medicine, can also help medical students learn various skills through both formal and informal ways. The need of the hour is to actively involve patients in the process of clinical teaching and make students learn medicine from the beneficiary perspective.

Keywords: Feedback, medical education, patient


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Strengthening the component of obtaining feedback from patients and using the same to facilitate the teaching of medical students. Amrita J Med 2022;18:102-4

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Strengthening the component of obtaining feedback from patients and using the same to facilitate the teaching of medical students. Amrita J Med [serial online] 2022 [cited 2023 Jan 28];18:102-4. Available from: https://ajmonline.org.in/text.asp?2022/18/3/102/363498




  Introduction Top


The process of assessment and delivering feedback to the medical students has been acknowledged as the key aspects to augment the knowledge, skills, and attitudes and to thereby ensure comprehensive professional development.[1] In fact, definitive evidence is available suggesting that feedback plays a crucial role in learning and is one of the most important approaches to enhance learning.[1],[2] Further, it has been envisaged that once the students accept the feedback and accordingly act upon it, the overall effect becomes even better. This calls for the need to utilize every learning opportunity and provide students with some form of constructive feedback for aiding them to attain the learning competencies.[1],[2],[3]


  Patients and Medical Education Top


In the process of medical curriculum delivery, a number of stakeholders such as teachers, students, administrators, parents, patients, members of the community, regulatory body, etc., have been identified.[2],[3] In order to produce a competent medical graduate on a sustainable basis, it is a must that each one of the stakeholders contributes toward the learning process in their capacities.[3],[4] Each of the patients who visits a hospital or those who are identified during community visits is a teacher in their own ways, as every one of them differs from each other. The sociodemographic profile, the clinical presentation, the socio-cultural values and practices make every patient unique, and it becomes the responsibility of the student to learn after establishing a rapport with them.[1],[2],[3]

The exposure or interaction with patients plays an important role in helping the medical students establish linkage between theoretical knowledge and clinical practice and understands the practical relevance of the learned topics.[4],[5] In addition, it even aids the students to acquire clinical skills and develop critical thinking, clinical reasoning, problem-solving, and decision-making skills.[4],[5],[6] Further, students learn the most important aspect of the medical profession, viz., the communication skills, by interacting with the patients and their family members. These interactions with patients for the entire duration of undergraduate training are priceless moments and help them learn a lot, and the students can become better by reflecting upon the various interactions.[3],[4],[5],[6]


  Daycare Procedures and Clinical Training Top


It will not be wrong to state that with the emergence of daycare procedures and the rising incidence of nosocomial infections, the amount of time spent by the inpatients in the hospital has significantly reduced. Though it is beneficial and cost-effective for the patients, from medical students’ perspective, it has minimized the number of learning opportunities available for the learners. This calls for the need that students should be more proactive and try to optimize their learning by interacting with all patients coming to the outpatient department, by interacting with their peers posted in other departments, and by interacting with their seniors and postgraduate residents, under the guidance of the faculty members.[7],[8] It is for us to decide about the path which we are willing to take and continue learning regardless of various other factors.


  Feedback from Patients Top


As already mentioned, patients remain an important stakeholder in the curriculum delivery; it is the responsibility of the healthcare professionals to utilize the time with patients for self-betterment and also to help them minimize their sufferings.[9],[10] Feedback received from patients can prove to be a significant add-on and help students ascertain what has been done well and which area needs improvement.[5],[6] In fact, some of the medical colleges have initiated training of undergraduate medical students using standardized patients, and the evaluation studies have shown that students have found it extremely useful, especially in the domains of improving communication skills, asking the history in the right order, reaching a clinical diagnosis, and the areas which they have failed to inquire from the patients.[11],[12],[13]

Even in clinical settings, workplace-based assessments have found immense utility as it gives judgment about how medical students perform in real-life scenarios. Realizing the importance of patients in improving the learning process, the use of multisource feedback tools has been widely encouraged and appreciated.[14] The use of this tool tends to provide a comprehensive evaluation about the performance of a student, including the evaluation of the domains of communication, professionalism, teamwork, leadership qualities, etc.[14] The feedback received from patients gives a different outlook from the beneficiaries’ perspective, and it can be used as a vital tool, whereas we move toward quality assurance and improvement of the healthcare delivery services.[15]

At Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, a constituent unit of the Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Deemed-to-be University, Puducherry, we have started the practice of obtaining feedback from patients and their caregivers at the time of discharge from the hospital. The idea is to identify the potential problems and thereby take necessary corrective measures to enhance the quality of healthcare services delivered to the patients.


  Conclusion Top


To conclude, patients are an important stakeholder and, apart from contributing to the advancement of medicine, can also help medical students learn various skills through both formal and informal ways. The need of the hour is to actively involve patients in the process of clinical teaching and make students learn medicine from the beneficiary perspective.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Authors’ contributions

SRS contributed in the conception or design of the work, drafting of the work, approval of the final version of the article, and agreed for all aspects of the work. PSS contributed in the literature review, revision of the article for important intellectual content, approval of the final version of the article, and agreed for all aspects of the work.



 
  References Top

1.
Kornegay JG, Kraut A, Manthey D, Omron R, Caretta-Weyer H, Kuhn G, et al. Feedback in medical education: A critical appraisal. AEM Educ Train 2017;1:98-109.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Bing-You R, Hayes V, Varaklis K, Trowbridge R, Kemp H, McKelvy D Feedback for learners in medical education: What is known? A scoping review. Acad Med 2017;92:1346-54.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Saedon H, Salleh S, Balakrishnan A, Imray CH, Saedon M The role of feedback in improving the effectiveness of workplace based assessments: A systematic review. BMC Med Educ 2012;12:25.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Kumah E, Ankomah SE, Kesse FO The impact of patient feedback on clinical practice. Br J Hosp Med (Lond) 2018;79:700-3.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Iserson KV Empowering clinician education with patient-outcome feedback. AEM Educ Train 2020;4:395-402.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Shenvi EC, Feupe SF, Yang H, El-Kareh R “Closing the loop”: A mixed-methods study about resident learning from outcome feedback after patient handoffs. Diagnosis (Berl) 2018;5:235-42.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Figueiró-Filho EA, Amaral E, McKinley D, Bezuidenhout J, Tekian A Minimal supervision out-patient clinical teaching. Clin Teach 2014;11:365-9.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Law M, Hamilton M, Bridge E, Brown A, Greenway M, Stobbe K The effect of clinical teaching on patient satisfaction in rural and community settings. Can J Rural Med 2014;19:57-62.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Hayes V, Bing-You R, Varaklis K, Trowbridge R, Kemp H, McKelvy D Is feedback to medical learners associated with characteristics of improved patient care? Perspect Med Educ 2017;6:319-24.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
Foy R, Skrypak M, Alderson S, Ivers NM, McInerney B, Stoddart J, et al. Revitalising audit and feedback to improve patient care. BMJ 2020;368:m213.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Yu J, Lee S, Kim M, Lee J, Park I Changes in medical students’ self-assessments of clinical communication skills after clinical practice and standardized patient feedback. Acad Psychiatry 2020;44:272-6.  Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.
Dayer Berenson L, Goodill SW, Wenger S Standardized patient feedback: Making it work across disciplines. J Allied Health 2012;41:e27-31.  Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.
Pfeiffer CA, Kosowicz LY, Holmboe E, Wang Y Face-to-face clinical skills feedback: Lessons from the analysis of standardized patient’s work. Teach Learn Med 2005;17:254-6.  Back to cited text no. 13
    
14.
Alofs L, Huiskes J, Heineman MJ, Buis C, Horsman M, van der Plank L, et al. User reception of a simple online multisource feedback tool for residents. Perspect Med Educ 2015;4:57-65.  Back to cited text no. 14
    
15.
Marsh C, Peacock R, Sheard L, Hughes L, Lawton R Patient experience feedback in UK hospitals: What types are available and what are their potential roles in quality improvement (QI)? Health Expect 2019;22:317-26.  Back to cited text no. 15
    




 

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  In this article
Abstract
Introduction
Patients and Med...
Daycare Procedur...
Feedback from Pa...
Conclusion
References

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